scissorsandthread
scissorsandthread:

Dessert Poster | A Fabulous Fete
Some people are obsessed with cheese & other savoury morsels. Though I do enjoy the occasional crisp, I’m a sweet tooth all the way. I love desserts - especially donuts! Oh and really light sponge cake with cream. And chocolate croissants and warm apple pie a la mode… oh man. Anyway, what were we talking about?! Oh that’s right, this amazing free print from A Fabulous Fete by artist Kori Clark. ‘The Sugar Shortlist’ is the perfect piece of art for the kitchen (or you could put it next to your bedside table for a sweet night’s sleep!).

scissorsandthread:

Dessert Poster | A Fabulous Fete

Some people are obsessed with cheese & other savoury morsels. Though I do enjoy the occasional crisp, I’m a sweet tooth all the way. I love desserts - especially donuts! Oh and really light sponge cake with cream. And chocolate croissants and warm apple pie a la mode… oh man. Anyway, what were we talking about?! Oh that’s right, this amazing free print from A Fabulous Fete by artist Kori Clark. ‘The Sugar Shortlist’ is the perfect piece of art for the kitchen (or you could put it next to your bedside table for a sweet night’s sleep!).

fastcodesign
fastcodesign:

Meet LOLCats’ Ancestors
A century before LOLCats and Doge memes took over the Internet, photographer Harry Whittier Frees, born in 1879, made bank specializing in adorable animal pictures. He sold postcards, calendars, and children’s books full of squee-inducing kitties and puppies dressed as people. Proving, once again, that the human obsession with cuteness is as timeless as it is ridiculous.
Read More>

fastcodesign:

Meet LOLCats’ Ancestors

A century before LOLCats and Doge memes took over the Internet, photographer Harry Whittier Frees, born in 1879, made bank specializing in adorable animal pictures. He sold postcards, calendars, and children’s books full of squee-inducing kitties and puppies dressed as people. Proving, once again, that the human obsession with cuteness is as timeless as it is ridiculous.

Read More>

blogilates
blogilates:

Good looking food always makes you want to eat it. (Even if it’s veggies you may think you hate!) Take time to prepare nice dishes when you’re making meals to turn an ordinary snack or dinner into a culinary experience! It’s also very soothing and therapeutic to prepare. Remember that it doesn’t have to be fancy…it just has to be made with love♥️

blogilates:

Good looking food always makes you want to eat it. (Even if it’s veggies you may think you hate!) Take time to prepare nice dishes when you’re making meals to turn an ordinary snack or dinner into a culinary experience! It’s also very soothing and therapeutic to prepare. Remember that it doesn’t have to be fancy…it just has to be made with love♥️

fastcodesign
fastcodesign:

Cuteness is a powerful commodity. Here’s why you cannot resist the squee.

So cuteness can be animate or inanimate. The distinction might seem trivial on the surface, but recent evidence suggests our brains appreciate it—and prompt us to behave in different ways as a result. Baby cuteness triggers thoughts of vulnerability and protection that lead to careful actions. So-called “whimsical cuteness,” on the other hand, sparks ideas of playfulness and self-reward that make us indulge.
“There are two dimensions of cuteness: the baby cuteness versus this whimsical cuteness,” Gergana Nenkov, a marketing scholar at Boston College, tells Co.Design. “They have very different associations.”
Baby cuteness—behavioral scientists call it kindchenschema—centers on the irresistible features of tinyhood: the bulging forehead, the big eyes, the puffy cheeks. Studies routinely find that people who see images of baby cuteness feel intense and measurable desires to protect the lil’uns (including puppies and kittens). In this heightened caregiving state, people even display better fine motor skills than they do under normal circumstances.

Read More>
[Image: Kitty via Shutterstock]

fastcodesign:

Cuteness is a powerful commodity. Here’s why you cannot resist the squee.

So cuteness can be animate or inanimate. The distinction might seem trivial on the surface, but recent evidence suggests our brains appreciate it—and prompt us to behave in different ways as a result. Baby cuteness triggers thoughts of vulnerability and protection that lead to careful actions. So-called “whimsical cuteness,” on the other hand, sparks ideas of playfulness and self-reward that make us indulge.

“There are two dimensions of cuteness: the baby cuteness versus this whimsical cuteness,” Gergana Nenkov, a marketing scholar at Boston College, tells Co.Design. “They have very different associations.”

Baby cuteness—behavioral scientists call it kindchenschema—centers on the irresistible features of tinyhood: the bulging forehead, the big eyes, the puffy cheeks. Studies routinely find that people who see images of baby cuteness feel intense and measurable desires to protect the lil’uns (including puppies and kittens). In this heightened caregiving state, people even display better fine motor skills than they do under normal circumstances.

Read More>

[Image: Kitty via Shutterstock]